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NEWS
BIG expand Danish WWII bunker and create museum camouflaged among the dunes
POSTED 14 Jul 2017 . BY Kim Megson
Bjarke Ingels Group’s (BIG) transformation of a former German WWII bunker into a cultural complex camouflaged among the protected dunes of Blåvand, western Denmark, has opened to the public.

Conceived as “a sanctuary in the sand”, the 82,000sq m (882,600sq ft) museum, called Tirpitz, has been successfully completed three years after construction began.

Upon arrival, visitors first see the bunker, which was one of hundreds of coastal defences and fortifications built by the German army during the war as a defence against an invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe.

Beyond the bunker, the new museum emerges as a series of intersecting, precise cuts in the shoreland landscape – designed to contrast with the heavy volume of the wartime structure.

The complex is divided into four main underground galleries, each with their own rectangular-shaped space. These can be viewed and accessed from a central courtyard on ground level, with 6m tall glass panels allowing natural light to flood into the interior spaces. A tunnel links the galleries with the back of the bunker.

“The architecture of the Tirpitz is the antithesis to the WWII bunker,” said BIG founder Bjarke Ingels. “The heavy hermetic object is countered by the inviting lightness and openness of the new museum.

“The galleries are integrated into the dunes like an open oasis in the sand – a sharp contrast to the Nazi fortress’ concrete monolith. The surrounding heath-lined pathways cut into the dunes from all sides descending to meet in a central clearing, bringing daylight and air into the heart of the complex. The bunker remains the only landmark of a not so distant dark heritage that upon close inspection marks the entrance to a new cultural meeting place.”

The building consists of four main materials and elements – concrete, steel, glass and wood – which are found in the existing structures and natural landscape of the area. The walls of the exhibition rooms are made of concrete cast onsite, supporting the landscape and carrying the roof decks – engineered by Swiss Lüchinger+Meyer – that cantilever out 36m (118ft). The main interior materials are wood and hot rolled steel, which is applied to all the interior walls.

Dutch scenographers Tinker Imagineers created the museum’s exhibitions, which showcase permanent and temporary themed experiences dedicated to Blåvand’s history and “treasure trove of hidden stories.”

‘Army of Concrete’ tells the human stories in the shadow of Hitler's enormous European defence project, the Atlantic Wall; ‘Gold of the West Coast’ is Western Europe's most comprehensive exhibition of amber; and ‘West Coast Stories’ tells 100,000 years of west coast history and is turned into a nighttime 4D theatre twice an hour. In the dark of the bunker, visitors can play with light and activate shadow plays that reveal how the bunker should have functioned.

“Tirpitz is a unique opportunity to combine nature and culture in a spectacular fashion,” said Erik Bär, founding partner, Tinker imagineers. “A visit to the museum is not a visit to an exhibition gallery, but a scenic journey through time and space of West Jutland. The idea is that the whole place itself comes to life following the rhythms of nature.”

The museum was financed by the municipality of Varde, alongside the A.P. Møller and Chastine Mc-Kinney Møller Foundation, the Nordea Foundation and the Augustinus Foundation. It is expected to attract around 100,000 visitors annually.

It is the latest in a series of major cultural projects for BIG. In 2013, the studio completed the Danish National Maritime Museum, in which crucial historic elements are integrated in an innovative concept of submersed galleries. They are also working on the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark; the MECA Cultural Center in Bordeaux, France; and the Smithsonian Institution Master Plan in Washington D.C, US.
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NEWS
BIG expand Danish WWII bunker and create museum camouflaged among the dunes
POSTED 14 Jul 2017 . BY Kim Megson
Bjarke Ingels Group’s (BIG) transformation of a former German WWII bunker into a cultural complex camouflaged among the protected dunes of Blåvand, western Denmark, has opened to the public.

Conceived as “a sanctuary in the sand”, the 82,000sq m (882,600sq ft) museum, called Tirpitz, has been successfully completed three years after construction began.

Upon arrival, visitors first see the bunker, which was one of hundreds of coastal defences and fortifications built by the German army during the war as a defence against an invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe.

Beyond the bunker, the new museum emerges as a series of intersecting, precise cuts in the shoreland landscape – designed to contrast with the heavy volume of the wartime structure.

The complex is divided into four main underground galleries, each with their own rectangular-shaped space. These can be viewed and accessed from a central courtyard on ground level, with 6m tall glass panels allowing natural light to flood into the interior spaces. A tunnel links the galleries with the back of the bunker.

“The architecture of the Tirpitz is the antithesis to the WWII bunker,” said BIG founder Bjarke Ingels. “The heavy hermetic object is countered by the inviting lightness and openness of the new museum.

“The galleries are integrated into the dunes like an open oasis in the sand – a sharp contrast to the Nazi fortress’ concrete monolith. The surrounding heath-lined pathways cut into the dunes from all sides descending to meet in a central clearing, bringing daylight and air into the heart of the complex. The bunker remains the only landmark of a not so distant dark heritage that upon close inspection marks the entrance to a new cultural meeting place.”

The building consists of four main materials and elements – concrete, steel, glass and wood – which are found in the existing structures and natural landscape of the area. The walls of the exhibition rooms are made of concrete cast onsite, supporting the landscape and carrying the roof decks – engineered by Swiss Lüchinger+Meyer – that cantilever out 36m (118ft). The main interior materials are wood and hot rolled steel, which is applied to all the interior walls.

Dutch scenographers Tinker Imagineers created the museum’s exhibitions, which showcase permanent and temporary themed experiences dedicated to Blåvand’s history and “treasure trove of hidden stories.”

‘Army of Concrete’ tells the human stories in the shadow of Hitler's enormous European defence project, the Atlantic Wall; ‘Gold of the West Coast’ is Western Europe's most comprehensive exhibition of amber; and ‘West Coast Stories’ tells 100,000 years of west coast history and is turned into a nighttime 4D theatre twice an hour. In the dark of the bunker, visitors can play with light and activate shadow plays that reveal how the bunker should have functioned.

“Tirpitz is a unique opportunity to combine nature and culture in a spectacular fashion,” said Erik Bär, founding partner, Tinker imagineers. “A visit to the museum is not a visit to an exhibition gallery, but a scenic journey through time and space of West Jutland. The idea is that the whole place itself comes to life following the rhythms of nature.”

The museum was financed by the municipality of Varde, alongside the A.P. Møller and Chastine Mc-Kinney Møller Foundation, the Nordea Foundation and the Augustinus Foundation. It is expected to attract around 100,000 visitors annually.

It is the latest in a series of major cultural projects for BIG. In 2013, the studio completed the Danish National Maritime Museum, in which crucial historic elements are integrated in an innovative concept of submersed galleries. They are also working on the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark; the MECA Cultural Center in Bordeaux, France; and the Smithsonian Institution Master Plan in Washington D.C, US.
MORE NEWS
MVRDV win competition for Shanghai Future Park showcasing nature, culture and entertainment
Dutch architects MVRDV are have announced a large-scale leisure project in Shanghai that will see the firm meld nature, culture and entertainment in a huge public park.
Adjaye Associates collaborate with former spy chiefs to design New York museum dedicated to espionage
Adjaye Associates have revealed their design for a new spy museum and interactive experience in the heart of New York, which is set to open this December.
IAAPA supporting Give Kids the World at 2017 expo
Give Kids the World Village – a cost-free resort for children with life threatening illnesses – will enter its 22nd year in partnership with IAAPA at the organisation’s annual expo, with a number of initiatives and events lined up for this year’s show.
Merlin planning global rollout for Bear Grylls attractions, says Varney
After announcing its intention to develop a Bear Grylls attraction in the UK, Merlin CEO Nick Varney has revealed further plans for the adventure survivalist, with plans to take the concept overseas in a major attraction rollout.
More news>
LATEST JOBS
Chef Manager
Marwell Wildlife
Salary: Competitive
Location: Winchester, United Kingdom
National Manager - Programmes and Events
The Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust
Salary: Up to £30,000 pa
Location: Slimbridge, United Kingdom
Operations Manager
The National Museum of the Royal Navy
Salary: £26,000 - £31,000
Location: Portsmouth, United Kingdom
Executive Assistant
Legoland
Salary: Competitive
Location: Carlsbad, CA, United States
Retail Director
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Salary: Competitive
Location: Carlsbad, CA, United States
Duty Manager
Madame Tussauds
Salary: Competitive
Location: Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA, United States



 
 
ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media, Portmill House, Portmill Lane,
Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG5 1DJ Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2017

ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
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NEWS
BIG expand Danish WWII bunker and create museum camouflaged among the dunes
POSTED 14 Jul 2017 . BY Kim Megson
Bjarke Ingels Group’s (BIG) transformation of a former German WWII bunker into a cultural complex camouflaged among the protected dunes of Blåvand, western Denmark, has opened to the public.

Conceived as “a sanctuary in the sand”, the 82,000sq m (882,600sq ft) museum, called Tirpitz, has been successfully completed three years after construction began.

Upon arrival, visitors first see the bunker, which was one of hundreds of coastal defences and fortifications built by the German army during the war as a defence against an invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe.

Beyond the bunker, the new museum emerges as a series of intersecting, precise cuts in the shoreland landscape – designed to contrast with the heavy volume of the wartime structure.

The complex is divided into four main underground galleries, each with their own rectangular-shaped space. These can be viewed and accessed from a central courtyard on ground level, with 6m tall glass panels allowing natural light to flood into the interior spaces. A tunnel links the galleries with the back of the bunker.

“The architecture of the Tirpitz is the antithesis to the WWII bunker,” said BIG founder Bjarke Ingels. “The heavy hermetic object is countered by the inviting lightness and openness of the new museum.

“The galleries are integrated into the dunes like an open oasis in the sand – a sharp contrast to the Nazi fortress’ concrete monolith. The surrounding heath-lined pathways cut into the dunes from all sides descending to meet in a central clearing, bringing daylight and air into the heart of the complex. The bunker remains the only landmark of a not so distant dark heritage that upon close inspection marks the entrance to a new cultural meeting place.”

The building consists of four main materials and elements – concrete, steel, glass and wood – which are found in the existing structures and natural landscape of the area. The walls of the exhibition rooms are made of concrete cast onsite, supporting the landscape and carrying the roof decks – engineered by Swiss Lüchinger+Meyer – that cantilever out 36m (118ft). The main interior materials are wood and hot rolled steel, which is applied to all the interior walls.

Dutch scenographers Tinker Imagineers created the museum’s exhibitions, which showcase permanent and temporary themed experiences dedicated to Blåvand’s history and “treasure trove of hidden stories.”

‘Army of Concrete’ tells the human stories in the shadow of Hitler's enormous European defence project, the Atlantic Wall; ‘Gold of the West Coast’ is Western Europe's most comprehensive exhibition of amber; and ‘West Coast Stories’ tells 100,000 years of west coast history and is turned into a nighttime 4D theatre twice an hour. In the dark of the bunker, visitors can play with light and activate shadow plays that reveal how the bunker should have functioned.

“Tirpitz is a unique opportunity to combine nature and culture in a spectacular fashion,” said Erik Bär, founding partner, Tinker imagineers. “A visit to the museum is not a visit to an exhibition gallery, but a scenic journey through time and space of West Jutland. The idea is that the whole place itself comes to life following the rhythms of nature.”

The museum was financed by the municipality of Varde, alongside the A.P. Møller and Chastine Mc-Kinney Møller Foundation, the Nordea Foundation and the Augustinus Foundation. It is expected to attract around 100,000 visitors annually.

It is the latest in a series of major cultural projects for BIG. In 2013, the studio completed the Danish National Maritime Museum, in which crucial historic elements are integrated in an innovative concept of submersed galleries. They are also working on the LEGO House in Billund, Denmark; the MECA Cultural Center in Bordeaux, France; and the Smithsonian Institution Master Plan in Washington D.C, US.
 


ADVERTISE . CONTACT US

Leisure Media, Portmill House, Portmill Lane,
Hitchin, Hertfordshire SG5 1DJ Tel: +44 (0)1462 431385

©Cybertrek 2017

ABOUT LEISURE MEDIA
LEISURE MEDIA MAGAZINES
LEISURE MEDIA HANDBOOKS
LEISURE MEDIA WEBSITES
LEISURE MEDIA PRODUCT SEARCH
PRINT SUBSCRIPTIONS
FREE DIGITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS